Events


OCT
17
Date:
Wednesday, 17 Oct 2018
Time:
3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location:
B310 Wells Hall
Department:
Muslim Studies Center
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Qais Yahia Assali, Artist-in-Residence will present a lecture on his art.

Qais Assali (b. 1987 Palestine) is a visual artist, designer and educator. He has worked as a faculty atseveral academic institutions in Palestine. Assali is currently doing two masters programs: MA in ArtEducation at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and MFA at Bard College.  

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OCT
24
Date:
Wednesday, 24 Oct 2018
Time:
7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Location:
Wells Hall B119
Department:
Muslim Studies Center
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The documentary, Little Gandhi, is centred on the uprising that began in 2011 and tells the story of Ghiyath Matar, a young Syrian activist.

Ghiyath wanted to free Syria from Bashar al-Assad, but renounced violence and confronted heavily armed police and troops with symbols of brotherhood.

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OCT
30
Date:
Tuesday, 30 Oct 2018
Time:
7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Location:
MSU Main Library (Green Room), 4th Floor
Department:
Muslim Studies Center
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Muslim Journeys Book Club: American Islamophobia by Khaled Beydoun.

Discussion with Nazita Lajevardi, Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science

The term "Islamophobia" may be fairly new, but irrational fear and hatred of Islam and Muslims is anything but. Though many speak of Islamophobia's roots in racism, have we considered how anti-Muslim rhetoric is rooted in our legal system?

Using his unique lens as a critical race theorist and law professor, Khaled A. Beydoun captures the many ways in which law, policy, and official state rhetoric have fueled the frightening resurgence of Islamophobia in the United States. Beydoun charts its long and terrible history, from the plight of enslaved African Muslims in the antebellum South and the laws prohibiting Muslim immigrants from becoming citizens to the ways the war on terror assigns blame for any terrorist act to Islam and the myriad trials Muslim Americans face in the Trump era. He passionately argues that by failing to frame Islamophobia as a system of bigotry endorsed and emboldened by law and carried out by government actors, U.S. society ignores the injury it inflicts on both Muslims and non-Muslims. Through the stories of Muslim Americans who have experienced Islamophobia across various racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic lines, Beydoun shares how U.S. laws shatter lives, whether directly or inadvertently. And with an eye toward benefiting society as a whole, he recommends ways for Muslim Americans and their allies to build coalitions with other groups. Like no book before it, American Islamophobia offers a robust and genuine portrait of Muslim America then and now.

 

NOV
1
Date:
Thursday, 01 Nov 2018
Time:
12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location:
303 International Center
Department:
Muslim Studies Center
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Islamic Architecture by Amr Azim

FEB
14
Date:
Thursday, 14 Feb 2019
Time:
All day
Location:
303 International Center
Department:
Muslim Studies Center
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Contemporary Arab cities are dynamic entities within and through which larger national, regional and global political-economic, technological and cultural forces interact. Global discourses of urban development and redevelopment, for example, contribute to traumatic dislocations in predictable ways, but also open new pathways to power and new dynamics of place- and community-making as local forces turn such discourses to their own purposes. Social conflict and war, too, have their own political economies and logics of creation and destruction, as politicians and profiteers speculate, and rebels and refugees improvise and innovate survival strategies and new forms of self-government. Reconstruction further reorganizes urban space and economic opportunity, as it gives rise to new and innovative approaches to urban planning, architecture and heritage preservation. Burgeoning creative scenes introduce new aesthetics and make possible new identities and forms of resistance. At the same time, they commodify culture and anchor emergent art markets with increasingly global connections.  Just as Kurds, Copts, Armenians and Chaldeans have contributed to the creative flux of Arab cities, so too does contemporary migration from the Arab world create hybrid cultural and political formations and new linguistic landscapes as migrants adapt to and alter metropolitan spaces around the world. 

 

FEB
15
Date:
Friday, 15 Feb 2019
Time:
All day
Location:
303 International Center
Department:
Muslim Studies Center
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This conference will explore not only the physicality of Arab cities or the sociality of Arab urban environments, but also the place of the urban in Arab history, philosophy, literature and the arts.

FEB
16
Date:
Saturday, 16 Feb 2019
Time:
All day
Location:
303 International Center
Department:
Muslim Studies Center
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This conference will explore not only the physicality of Arab cities or the sociality of Arab urban environments, but also the place of the urban in Arab history, philosophy, literature and the arts.

APR
11
Date:
Thursday, 11 Apr 2019
Time:
10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location:
303 International Center
Department:
Muslim Studies Center
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Education Under Siege: Attacks on Scholars and Scholarship in Turbulent Times

 

We are witnessing today what many scholars characterize as the collapse of the post-Cold War liberal order—with serious consequences for Muslims in predominantly Muslim countries as well as for those living in minority communities around the world. The collapse is marked by intensifying violence between state and non-state actors, by deepening social, economic, and environmental crisis, and by the reemergence of autocratic and despotic rule as viable and desirable forms of governance. Political, ethnic, and religious minorities are suspect, and political and economic refugees are viewed as clear and present dangers. In this new world (dis)order, academia is but one of the casualties. This is witnessed by the attack and scapegoating of scholars and their scholarship as threats to national solidarity, economic prosperity, and/or state security.  Such attacks take on different modes of repression and violence depending on the nature of the conflict and the strategies available to those state and non-state actors who see themselves as arbiters of national or communal order. In this context, scholars have suffered intimidation, firings, arrest, exile, and assassination. Schools and institutions of higher education have been defunded, besieged, closed, and violently attacked. Scholarly research and curriculums deemed contrary to the moral fabric of society or to the larger national interest have been denounced, censored, and/or outlawed. Taking "Education Under Siege" as the theme of this conference, we suggest a focus on the following areas:

 

APR
12
Date:
Friday, 12 Apr 2019
Time:
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location:
303 International Center
Department:
Muslim Studies Center
Read Event Details

Education Under Siege: Attacks on Scholars and Scholarship in Turbulent Times

We are witnessing today what many scholars characterize as the collapse of the post-Cold War liberal order—with serious consequences for Muslims in predominantly Muslim countries as well as for those living in minority communities around the world. The collapse is marked by intensifying violence between state and non-state actors, by deepening social, economic, and environmental crisis, and by the reemergence of autocratic and despotic rule as viable and desirable forms of governance. Political, ethnic, and religious minorities are suspect, and political and economic refugees are viewed as clear and present dangers. In this new world (dis)order, academia is but one of the casualties. This is witnessed by the attack and scapegoating of scholars and their scholarship as threats to national solidarity, economic prosperity, and/or state security.  Such attacks take on different modes of repression and violence depending on the nature of the conflict and the strategies available to those state and non-state actors who see themselves as arbiters of national or communal order. In this context, scholars have suffered intimidation, firings, arrest, exile, and assassination. Schools and institutions of higher education have been defunded, besieged, closed, and violently attacked. Scholarly research and curriculums deemed contrary to the moral fabric of society or to the larger national interest have been denounced, censored, and/or outlawed.